Running Races

Race Preparation

The tips for the next few weeks will be about things to do to prepare for an event, it doesn't matter what distance or type of event you have entered, it is good to be prepared and these tips should give you some idea of what is required to be ready for a race. These tips are directed towards the Noosa Half on August 19th, but they can be used for any event.
What to Wear?
In a race like the Noosa Half Marathon, you are going to be running with some of the best runners in Australia (and the world) and of course you will be seeing some of the best, most expensive running gear as well, in fact some of the outfits are so miniscule you will probably think its more underwear than outerwear.

TIP 1- Don't think because you are in an event you have to race out and buy some expensive, trendy running gear. If you do need new running gear go and buy it now and start wearing it on your next run. If it still doesn't feel as comfortable as your old running gear by race day, just revert back to your old gear. If your favourite running shirt, is the oldest, smelliest ,holiest one you have, but it is the best to run in...wear it!!. Believe me no one is going to be checking out what you are wearing, so don't worry about how dorky you look, you have to be comfortable. Don't wear anything too skimpy, or something you feel self conscious in, you don't want to be pulling out wedgies for 21km's or even 10km's. If any of your clothing needs to be adjusted  when you run, don't wear it, it's not right for you. You shouldn't have to touch anything you are wearing.

TIP 2- Do not wear anything new on the day, this includes everything you wear, even the little things like socks, earrings, hats etc. Everything you wear on race day should have been worn on some of your training runs. Buy your new gear now and try it out. Over the nest few weeks try running in a few different combinations of gear and then choose the outfit that felt the best and don't alter or change it on the day.

TIP 3- Do not carry anything in the race. Do not start with a long sleeved top on that you know will have to be removed when you get hot. Even if it's cold at the start, get rid of the jumper before you run. If you start removing clothing in the race, you have to carry it or tie it around your waist, that's when the clothing adjusting starts and  it can get very irritating as you are running. If you have a car key, pin it to your shorts or in a pocket if you have one. Don't have money or other things jingling in your pockets, very annoying!!. I don't believe in wearing the i pods in a race, but if you do, make sure it's strapped to your arm. Don't take your phone, you won't need it!

TIP 4- Try not to do too much different on the day of the race to what you would normally do. I know it's very exciting down at the start and there is a very different feel on the morning. It's busy, crowded and there's alot of waiting around, but in your head just look at it as a normal run for you. If you wear a hat in training wear one on the day, if you don't wear sunglasses in training, don't wear them on the day. If you have a drink of juice before you normally go for a run have one on the day, don't change your normal routine.


Race Training Three Weeks Out
Half Marathon
3 weeks to go- Muck up Sesh-Sprints/Rest Day/ 10km Tempo Run-2km pace, 2km Tempo(20 to 30 seconds faster per km than pace), 2km pace, 2km Tempo, 2km Pace/ Rest day/s/Ho Hum Run-18-21km slow pace
2 weeks to go- Muck Up Sesh- Drills / Rest Day/  8km Tempo Run- 2km easy,1km intervals( 8sec fast /12 sec recovery), 2km easy, I km intervals, 2km easy/ Rest day/s / Ho Hum Run 12-14km easy pace
1 week to go- Muck Up Sesh -easy 10km/ Rest day/ Easy 8km or Lazy Runner social run on Friday / Two Rest days/ Race Day- Half Marathon

10km
3 weeks to go- Muck up Sesh-Sprints/Rest Day/ 8km Tempo Run-2km pace, 2km Tempo(20 to 30 seconds faster per km than pace), 2km pace, 2km Tempo / Rest day/s/Ho Hum Run-11-12 km easy pace
2 weeks to go- Muck Up Sesh- Drills / Rest Day/  8km Tempo Run- 2km easy,1km intervals( 8sec fast /12 sec recovery), 2km easy, I km intervals, 2km easy/ Rest day/s / Ho Hum Run 11-12km easy pace
1 week to go- Muck Up Sesh -easy 8km/ Rest day/ Easy 6-8km or Lazy Runner social run on Friday / Two Rest days/ Race Day- Half Marathon

5km
3 weeks to go- Muck up Sesh-Sprints/Rest Day/ 6km Tempo Run-2km pace, 2km Tempo(20 to 30 seconds faster per km than pace), 2km pace / Rest day/s/Ho Hum Run-5-7km easy pace
2 weeks to go- Muck Up Sesh- Drills / Rest Day/  6km Tempo Run- 1km easy,1km intervals( 8sec fast /12 sec recovery), 1km easy, I km intervals, 2km easy/ Rest day/s / Ho Hum Run 7km easy pace
1 week to go- Muck Up Sesh -easy 6km/ Rest day/ Easy 5-6km or Lazy Runner social run on Friday / Two Rest days/ Race Day- Half Marathon


Which Race Is For You??
5km
Running History- one month of running 3 times or more a week
Training Time- Four weeks of training, during which you have run at least 6kms

10km
Running History- Two months of running 3 times a week or more
Training Time-Six weeks of regular training during which time you have run at least one 11km or 12km distance at your own pace

Half Marathon
Running History- Four months of running 3 times a week or more
Training Time- Three months of regular training, during which time you complete one run of 18 to 22 kms.


Note: Your training should include a hard session (our weekday one is sufficient), one long self paced run(our weekend run), one shorter tempo run (something for you to do solo), and if you want another self paced medium distance run (between 5km and 10km)

 

Run Your Own Race
A lot of Lazy Runners are entering in races this program and have been training in groups for them. I have noticed some great friendships and running buddies formed and it’s good to see runners running together and chatting, because as we know those long km’s can be very boring and unstimulating so it’s good to have other runners about motivating you. BUT…I have noticed that because of this buddy system or running groups sometimes some runners are out of their own pace and that often means out of their comfort zone. When you are training for distance races you really need to run at your own pace and comfort level. If you happen to be running with someone the same pace as you that’s great, but be aware that even if they are the same pace, there maybe times on the run when they lose stamina and slow down a little, and at that time you may be still feeling good and want to surge on..here’s the big Tip...surge. Don’t worry, maybe a km up ahead, you will fall in a little hole (figuratively that is) and they may catch up and even pass you, that’s great, for them and then it gives you the option to get back up to them.
Lance and I would never bitch about Dennis when he powers up hills like a madman on speed, (well at least we wait until he is out of earshot before we start bitching, luckily for us that doesn’t take long). In fact I like my running buddies to be faster than me, I feel it pushes me, and gives me something in front to focus on and I need that. If I can still see Dennis, I’m happy, I don’t care how far in front he is but if he is in eyesight I always feel that I will have the opportunity to reel him back in. Often we all take it in turns to surge forward on our training runs and we find we usually end up at the finish pretty close together. It’s not a deliberate thing we just run however we are feeling at that time.
Most runners do not expect another runner to stay with them, my advice is... if you are feeling good, run strong, don’t worry about your buddy, they are big boys and girls, they won’t get lost. Some runners make up distance on hills, some lose it on hills, but I have often found that if someone is the same pace as you, you often end up meeting each other time and time again on a long run, and it’s good, you just have a chat and then the surging starts all over again.
On my first Marathon, Melbourne, after about 5km I found myself running with a man and his adult son, we all hit it off really well, so we chatted and ran until the 21km mark, the son dropped away at that stage and dad didn’t seem to care, he and I were still keeping a nice pace so we ran on, at 30km. I could feel him slowing, so I slowed, I didn’t want to lose him, it was my first marathon and I wanted to stay with this guy to the finish. He started fading more and at one stage I looked back and he yelled at me “Don’t look back, keep going”. I said “No I want to stay with you”, but he insisted “Keep running you are going well, don’t ruin your race because of me, you are going to be fine”, so I looked ahead, and with near tears in my eyes I kept running and I didn’t look back. My God it was like something out of Gone with the Wind, I wanted to turn and yell “Don’t leave me Rhett” but I could see by his face that frankly my dear he couldn’t give a damn. I did  finish the Melbourne marathon strong and I don’t know what happened to my buddy, but he was right, don’t ruin your own race, you have trained so hard, your running buddies are all in the same boat, it doesn’t matter who you train with you have to eventually run your own race.
Also on any given day of a long run, everyone is dealing with what has happened over the past week, you may have had a good week and your buddy has had a shit week, you may be in a bad mood, buddy is on top of the world, your legs may be tired and heavy theirs may have grown wings overnight. Everyday is different, every run is not the same, so each time you’re out there you cannot expect the group to be all feeling the same.

In South Africa, it was a forest marathon and pretty tough, I was struggling along in the first 10km feeling lousy and sure I was going to have the worst race. The young guy in front of me was running in non-marathon running gear and he had this huge back pack on, I couldn’t help but ask when I passed if him if he was planning to camp out overnight. He told me he had never run a marathon and thought he had to bring his own provisions. He had enough food and drink in the back pack to feed a small family for a week. We got chatting, he was a young South African only 25 and he was good runner but he seemed pretty unprepared. We stuck together but every 5km there was a drink station (I think I’ve already mentioned that the drink stations in the Knysna marathon were like Sizzler buffet bars), so my little buddy would stop and chow down and I would run straight through, but always about 10 minutes later I would hear him coming up behind saying “Wait up Matilda what’s the hurry?”. We continued that pattern for another 25 kms, and it was good fun, however at the second last smorgasbord, I lost him. Don’t know if he had one to many boiled potatoes or the back pack finally killed him, but I never saw him again. It didn’t matter, we had a great run when we were together, and I ‘m sure he finished his race as I did mine, that is all that matters.

Moral of the story, if you are running along and having a chat and feel good with the person you’re with that’s great, if that person take off on you, good luck to them, if you feel like running faster off you go..no one minds. Like all Lazy Runner long runs we will all catch up afterwards for a drink, a stretch or a coffee and find out how far, bad or good everyones run was.


 

 
     
 
 

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